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Things to Eat and Drink in Japan

Japanese Food

Tsukemono



Last update December 31, 2020

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Tsukemono  つけもの, 漬物

Japanese Pickles

Shortened from Tsukeru (pickle) and Mono (thing), it's another Gohan promoter along with Tsukudani. And for that reason, its diversity is almost limitless. At a Japanese breakfast table where a bowl of steaming rice and Miso Shiru (soybean soup) are served, lightly-pickled Asa Zuke would be refreshing. If your lunch is Domburi (rice with toppings) of say, chicken and egg, it will come with a few slices of yellow, sweetish and juicy Takuan (radish). For supper, you may want to pick up some slices of Nuka Zuke (using a fermented rice bran paste) as an Ate (Otsumami, a side dish for alcoholic drinks). When visiting Kyoto, you'll find many Shiba Zuke products in shops while Nara offers Nara Zuke as their specialty. The former uses red Shiso (Perilla frutescens) leaves and the latter, Sake Kasu (Sake lees).

hakusai
Asazuke of Hakusai.
hariharizuke
Tsukemono of radish cut in the gingko leave shape.
takana
Takana or Japanese leaf mustard pickled with pepper.
rakkyo
Japanese Rakkyo scallion bulb pickles.
hanazuke
Hana Zuke or pickled Japanese rape blossoms.
narazuke
Nara Zuke, a local delicacy in Nara.
kabu_tsukemono
Tsukemono of turnip.
takuan
Takuan or pickled radish in Nuka (fermented rice bran) and salt.
senmaizuke
Semnai Zuke of turnip cut into thin sheets, pickled in vinegar with Kombu and chili pepper.
hakusai
Asazuke of Hakusai.

hariharizuke
Tsukemono of radish cut in the gingko leave shape.

takana
Takana or Japanese leaf mustard pickeld with pepper.

rakkyo
Japanese Rakkyo scallion bulb pickles.

hanazuke
Hana Zuke or pickled Japanese rape blossoms.

narazuke
Nara Zuke, a local delicacy in Nara.

kabu_tsukemono
Tsukemono of turnip.

takuan
Takuan or pickled radish in Nuka (fermented rice bran) and salt.

senmaizuke
Semnai Zuke of turnip cut into thin sheets, pickled in vinegar with Kombu and chili pepper.

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